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Ambulating A Patient

Internship-X-Block/Ambulating-A-Patient

A badge that demonstrates your ability to ambulate a patient safely and adequately.

 

Bianca E.

Expert

Awarded badge on May 30, 2017

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Quite the process in learning how to ambulate patients.  I had never heard of a gait belt before or what it was for, now I know.
The reflection lets me know what you got out of the process.
Small e40911d4fa646f9e8483167b338b5cf4 biancae About 2 years ago

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Process

Evidence visible to public
Pick and reflect on an artifact that illustrates the strategies you used to be successful in a task. More Info

The training I took in order to be successful with this task.

Required Artifact:
1.  Knock on the door, enter the room and introduce self using name and title
2. Verbalize the performance of hand hygiene
3. Explain care plans to patient before beginning task and continue to communicate with patient during care
4. Identify patient as a fall-risk patient by verbalizing they look for the following items:   Yellow no-slip socks, Yellow wristband, Sunflower (fall risk indicator) on or near the doorway
5. Verbalize that they would ask the patient’s RN the following questions before ambulating the patient: Can I get your patient up now? Which ambulatory aids do I need to use with this patient?  What else do I need to know about the patient’s status?
6. Gather materials: Gait belt
7. Assess the room and patient by verbalizing they look for the following items: All lines connected to the patient, Obstacles that would pose a threat to the patient’s safety during ambulation, Patient has non-slip socks or shoes on
8. Assist the patient to scoot to the edge of the chair with their feet flat on the floor
9. Make direct eye contact with patient and ask the patient if they are feeling dizzy or lightheaded (if patient answers “yes”, assist the patient to sit back down, press the call light to notify the RN and do not leave patient unattended)
10. Apply the gait belt to patient, secure the belt so that only fingers laid flat against the patient fit under the belt, and check that the belt does not catch skin or skin folds (e. g.: breast tissue or abdominal folds)
11. Use proper body mechanics when assisting patient to stand by: Keeping a low center of gravity by bending the knees, Not bending at the waist, Creating a wide base of support and distributing weight evenly, Keeping back straight and maintaining proper alignment
12. Use a count of “1, 2, 3” to signal the patient, assisting them to a standing position with one hand on the gait belt and one hand on the patient
13. Make direct eye contact with patient and ask the patient if they are feeling dizzy or lightheaded (if patient answers “yes”, assist the patient to sit back down, press the call light to notify the RN and do not leave patient unattended)
14. Assist the patient to walk outside of the room by walking alongside and slightly behind the patient, holding onto the gait belt (may have an arm around the patient’s back if desired)
15. Remain close to a wall or other supportive structures and communicate with the patient throughout the walk, Monitor for signs of pain, fatigue or dizziness. Stop as necessary if patient experiences any of these symptoms
16. Assist the patient to walk back into the room to the chair while walking alongside and slightly behind them, holding onto the gait belt (may have an arm around the patient’s back if desired)
17. Remove gait belt from patient

Reflection:
In order to be successful with this task, I constantly had both the patients safety and my own personal safety in mind. I made sure that the patient I was assisting would not fall by making sure they felt stable. I would constantly be asking the patient how they felt throughout the whole process, whether they felt lightheaded or nauseated. In addition to frequently asking the patient how they felt, I would also have a gait belt around them the entire time in case if for any reason they felt as if they were going to faint. In the case of, I would be able catch them as safely as possible before they reach the ground. I made sure that lines (if any) attached to the patient did not increase the risk of falling by making sure to bring the device along with the patient (i.e., if it's an IV pole, I'd bring the IV pole with the patient), keeping it at a safe distance away from the patient. 

Product

Evidence visible to public
Pick and reflect on an artifact that proves you have the skills, knowledge, and dispositions represented by the badge. More Info

Reflection

This artifact represents the expectations for this badge by clearly demonstrating that a skilled and training professional (RN) has witnessed and has verified that I am able to ambulate a patient safely and adequately. 

Metacognative Reflection

Evidence visible to public
Write a reflection that explains how learning the skills, knowledge, and dispositions in this badge will help you ambulate a patient safely and adequately. More Info

Metacognative Reflection

The goals of this badge were to ambulate a patient safely and correctly. With the help of previous knowledge, such as knowing that you need to frequently be asking the individual how they're feeling (dizzy or weak) I was able to achieve the goals of this badge. Something I learned about ambulating a patient, that I did not know before, was that you need to apply a gait belt to the patient in order to have a better girp, in case if anything unexpected occurs. I figured that as long as you're holding onto the patients arm, you'd be able to catch them if they were to fall but turns out that that's not enough because you don't have much to hold onto if you're trying to prevent a hard fall. One significant thing I learned throughout this whole process was that you have to be on high alert with all patient, whether they're deemed fall risk or not because sometimes even those that are 'stable' can have a near fall experiences.